Aortic Stenosis

Aortic Stenosis

Aortic stenosis is the abnormal narrowing of the aortic valve from the ventricle into the aorta. When the aortic valve gets damaged, it restricts blood flow from the ventricle into the aorta making you feel weaker, out of breath and generally unwell. If you have a mild case of Aortic Stenosis, you may not need treatment, but in severe cases, surgery may be required to repair or replace the aortic valve.

Family and friends are usually the first people to notice the symptoms of aortic stenosis because they notice the day to day weakening and slowness in their loved ones.  Typically, people think the change in habits is just a part of normal ageing, so if you notice it’s getting harder to breathe or you struggle walking to the letterbox or make a cup of coffee please tell your doctor and ask for a check-up.

How do you get Aortic stenosis?

  • People may be born with an abnormality of the aortic valve in your heart.
  • You have rheumatic heart disease, a condition that scars the aortic heart valve and narrows its opening.
  • You have developed a build-up of calcium which stiffens the aortic valve and restrict the flow of blood.

The population and aortic stenosis

Approximately 14% of the Australian population over the age of 75 will experience some form of Aortic Stenosis. The symptoms of an Aortic Stenoses are commonly misunderstood by patients as ‘normal’ signs of ageing, but on a closer examination, up to 37% of people exhibit symptoms that can be mild, moderate or severe. Family and friends will usually notice the first signs as you find it hard to walk to the mailbox or you get out of breath when making a cup of tea.

Symptoms of aortic stenosis

  • Shortness of breath
  • Angina
  • Fatigue
  • Syncope or Presyncope
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Palpitations – an uncomfortable awareness of the heart beating rapidly or irregularly.

Aortic Stenosis, Heart Valve

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgical procedures for aortic stenosis

Severe aortic stenosis can be life-threatening. A referral to the Norwest Heart Valve Team may be required when considering treatment for:

  • Asymptomatic (of a condition producing or showing no symptoms) patients with severe heart valve disease.
  • Patients with multiple comorbidities (disorders co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder) where a heart valve intervention may be considered.

Dr Peter Fahmy is a qualified TAVI practitioner in Australia and provides the latest surgical and non-surgical treatment for Aortic Stenosis. To make an appointment we are just a phone call away or you make an appointment via this website.

You will find some frequently asked questions here. 

Aortic Stenosis

Aortic stenosis is the abnormal narrowing of the aortic valve from the ventricle into the aorta. When the aortic valve gets damaged, it restricts blood flow from the ventricle into the aorta making you feel weaker, out of breath and generally unwell. If you have a mild case of Aortic Stenosis, you may not need treatment, but in severe cases, surgery may be required to repair or replace the aortic valve.

Family and friends are usually the first people to notice the symptoms of aortic stenosis because they notice the day to day weakening and slowness in their loved ones.  Typically, people think the change in habits is just a part of normal ageing, so if you notice it’s getting harder to breathe or you struggle walking to the letterbox or make a cup of coffee please tell your doctor and ask for a check-up.

How do you get Aortic stenosis?

  • People may be born with an abnormality of the aortic valve in your heart.
  • You have rheumatic heart disease, a condition that scars the aortic heart valve and narrows its opening.
  • You have developed a build-up of calcium which stiffens the aortic valve and restrict the flow of blood.

The population and aortic stenosis

Approximately 14% of the Australian population over the age of 75 will experience some form of Aortic Stenosis. The symptoms of an Aortic Stenoses are commonly misunderstood by patients as ‘normal’ signs of ageing, but on a closer examination, up to 37% of people exhibit symptoms that can be mild, moderate or severe. Family and friends will usually notice the first signs as you find it hard to walk to the mailbox or you get out of breath when making a cup of tea.

Symptoms of aortic stenosis

  • Shortness of breath
  • Angina
  • Fatigue
  • Syncope or Presyncope
  • Rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • Palpitations – an uncomfortable awareness of the heart beating rapidly or irregularly.

 

 

 

 

Surgical procedures for aortic stenosis

Severe aortic stenosis is life-threatening 

A referral to the Norwest Heart Valve Team may be required when considering treatment for:

  • Asymptomatic (of a condition producing or showing no symptoms) patients with severe heart valve disease.
  • Patients with multiple comorbidities (disorders co-occurring with a primary disease or disorder) where a heart valve intervention may be considered.

Dr Peter Fahmy is a qualified TAVI practitioner in Australia and provides the latest surgical and non-surgical treatment for Aortic Stenosis. To make an appointment we are just a phone call away or you make an appointment via this website.

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